Judicial Bonds

Bonds for Court Matters

Judicial bonds are a class of surety obligations that are needed in civil actions and by the United States Admiralty Courts. Generally divided into "plaintiff" and "defendant" categories, they are also often referred to as "voluntary" or "compulsory" (plaintiff's bonds often being the former, and defendant's the later). The class and creditworthiness of the bond applicant are underwriting factors that determine if collateral will be required.

Civil Federal and State Courts

Each application should be submitted with a copy of the pertinent court documents, applicant's current financial statement, and the representing attorney's "C.V." or "resumé".

U.S. Admiralty Court Bond

In admiralty courts bonds are referred to as "stipulations". We offer bonds to ALL parties; libellants (plaintiffs), defendants and claimants (owners). Each application should be submitted with a copy of the pertinent court documents, applicant's current financial statement, and the representing attorney's (proctor's) "C.V." or "resumé ".

Fiduciary Bonds

A "fiduciary" is a person or entity appointed by a court to administer the assets of another. There are three basic classes of fiduciary bonds. Each has a similar purpose, i.e., to ensure the legal, fair and honest management of that third party's funds and property.

Probate Bonds

These are bonds for fiduciaries that administer the assets of a deceased. Each application should be submitted with a copy of the pertinent court documents, applicant's current financial statement, a schedule of the estate's assets and the representing attorney's"C.V." or "resumé".

Guardianship Bonds

These are bonds for fiduciaries that administer the assets of a "ward", an incapacitated or incompetent person. Each application should be submitted with a copy of the pertinent court documents, applicant's current financial statement, and a schedule of the guardianship assets.

Trustee Bonds

These are bonds for "receivers" and "trustees" appointed by a court to administer the assets of a business or individual. Each application should be submitted with a copy of the pertinent court documents, applicant's current financial statement, a schedule of the guardianship assets, AND the applicant's "C.V." or resumé evidencing his/her general business experience and ability to fulfill the responsibilities of a trustee.

The pages linked to this portal cite federal, state and local statutes which will be helpful in calculating proper bond penalties and jurisdictional-specific requirements. We provide the content of these pages to be helpful. If you feel that offer of general information about judicial surety bonds replaces the advice of competent counsel, you have misinterpreted our intent. Is there a reason for this disclaimer? Yes, some parties are not willing to accept responsibility for their failure to consult an attorney and would prefer to blame a bonding company that's only purpose is to be helpful. Get a lawyer!